News

Almanac Excerpt

RIVER BIRCH, Betula nigra

December
River Birch is most commonly found in moist areas. It is a fast-growing, medium-sized tree with a single or multiple stems that grows to be 50 to 70 feet tall.

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Almanac Excerpt

WITCH-HAZEL, Hamamelis virginiana

November
Witch-Hazel is a multi-stemmed shrub with a bowing, graceful form that grows eight to 15 feet high and wide. “Hamamelis” means the flower and fruit mature at the same time.

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Essay

Owls in Newton

Are there any owls in Newton ?
Yes, there are at least two species regularly residing in the city, but as nocturnal creatures, they are more often heard than seen.

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Artist Page

Cynthia Staples

Cynthia Staples is a Boston-based freelance writer and photographer. For nearly fifteen years she has worked with local education and environmental nonprofits as well as with national sustainability organizations.

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Almanac Excerpt

GREAT SPANGLED FRITILLARY, Speyeria cybel

September
The Great Spangled Fritillary is the most common fritillary butterfly in the northeastern U.S. It is relatively large, up to four inches, with orange to tawny brown wings that have a delicate pattern of markings and spots.

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Common Nighthawk
Almanac Excerpt

COMMON NIGHTHAWK, Chordeiles minor

August
In past years one could often see and hear the common nighthawk as it circled in the glow of streetlights, picking off moths and other insects attracted by the glare.

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Almanac Excerpt

AMERICAN CHESTNUT, Castanea dentata

July
The American Chestnut was once the most common tree in the eastern woods. Chestnut is in the beech family and is related to the oaks that replaced it as the dominant forest tree.

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News

Public Street Trees – A Choice

What is happening to Newton’s street trees?
In the early 1970’s there were approximately 40,000 trees lining the streets of Newton. Today, that number is about 26,000-a 35% loss.

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